Last week we featured some of the most precious cargo we can carry in our cars, in the shape of tiny humans, or babies and young children to be precise, and carrying on with our Christmas theme, this week we will look at how Santa should be carrying all of those presents, and, more importantly, how you should carry them safely and legally.

On previous occasions, Santa has been observed carrying goods which are not secure in his vehicle, which is a practice that is not allowed as it is dangerous. Incidentally, Santa has also been observed not wearing a seat belt, but we will talk about that on another occasion.

Carrying anything in the vehicle poses a risk, which can be reduced if we keep it secure. That’s why, for example, carrying your shopping on the back seat of the car is never a good idea. In the event of a collision, or even sudden braking, the items can become projectiles and shoot forward, causing any amount of personal or material damage. This applies to Santa and his loose items too.

Carrying loose items like this can lead to a fine of 200 euro, which includes your supermarket purchases, which many people, oblivious to the danger, do on a daily basis, and includes any item that Santa or his little helpers haven’t secured.

This infraction is reflected in article 14 of the General Traffic Regulations (RGC). It says that the cargo transported in a vehicle must not “drag, fall totally or partially or move in a dangerous way.” In that same section it is specified that the load cannot “compromise the stability of the vehicle” or it can involve a fine of 200 euro.

That is the reason why whatever you are transporting in your vehicle, it must be secure. The boot is the best place for carrying goods of course, although you can also benefit, at times, from a mesh in some vehicles.

In simple terms, everything you carry in your vehicle must be secure.

Going back to Santa for a moment, and if you have been a very good little girl or boy this year and are hoping for lots of presents, then Santa really must consider multiple trips, as should you, as driving with an overloaded vehicle can also lead to a fine, not only for the considerations of weight and stability, but limiting mobility or hindering the driver’s vision also carries a fine of 200 euro.

In addition, carrying a heavily loaded car also carries other risks, such as an object falling onto the road. The fine for this amounts to 500 euro, since it poses a danger to other users.

So, Santa, stay safe out there. We know you know where we live, and we will be tucked up in bed waiting for you to deliver. For everyone else, stay safe in this festive season and be sure that anything you carry is secure.

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